Safe take part in the annual fantasy football competition

Safe Computing have entered a league in the annual fantasy football competition organised by the Telegraph. The competition ‘kicks off’ on the 14 August 2010, and so far, 29 Safe employees have picked their teams. Safe have chosen a closed league, however anyone can enter a team by paying the registration fee and signing up at http://fantasyfootball.telegraph.co.uk. The Telegraph are offering a large cash prize to the winner, they have published that ‘there is £100,000 to be won, with £50,000 for the top prize,’ and entries are only £6 per fantasy team.

Anyone who signs up before the 14 August can take advantage of the ‘transfer amnesty’ to choose different players for free before ‘kick off’. Once the season begins, you can still change players, however there is a limit of 30 times. Lead Generation Manager for Safe Computing Renata Jones commented ‘I’ve joined the league, and confess to know nothing about football! It looks great fun, and the website really helps you to choose your teams, even if you are a complete novice like me!’

Safe have chosen to play the game the way the Telegraph recommends, by setting up a private league between colleagues, which any company can do. If you are a Safe employee from any of our four offices in Leicester, Nottingham, Hertfordshire, or London, and would like to join the Safe Computing fantasy football league with your team, simply sign up on the Telegraph website to choose your team. After signing up, just contact Raja Nawaz at Safe Computing Leicester office for the code to the ‘super league’.

We already have 29 teams in the Safe league, so a winner's medal will be presented to the Safe Computing league's champion at the end of the season. So come and join the fun!

Raja Nawaz

 

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